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St Barnabas

& St Paul's Church of England Primary School

Mathematics

Reception Curriculum Progression and Expectations

Mathematics

It is expected children will be secure at 40 - 60 months by the end of the Autumn term, begin working on the early learning goals in Spring term and securing these by the end of summer term.

Intention  

  • Children will be able to recognize, count, order, identify one more/one less (from 5, to 10 and then beyond to 20) and use language involved in adding and subtracting two single-digit numbers. Children will problem-solve with number, including sharing/halving and doubling amounts. 
  • Children will be able to use, name and describe shapes (2D and 3D) and create and explain a variety of patterns (shape, number, sequence).  
  • Language will be used in context involved with size, position, weight, capacity, distance, time and money. Children will also be able to solve problems regarding these concepts.

Implementation

Summer Term

Expectations           

 Implementation

Children solve problems involved in doubling.

Children are taught doubling using lots of practical examples, building on the work in Autumn term where children combined two sets of objects. Songs are also used to support this. Adults provide opportunities for children to apply their doubling skills within provision and use questions and discussion to further challenge them.

They solve problems involved in halving and sharing.

 

 

Children are taught this concept using concrete objects and then given opportunity to apply these skills within provision, such as sharing play food equally. Children with them move onto pictoral representations before more abstract concepts. Children are taught to halve amounts through practical activities such as cutting an apple and this is linked to work on sharing equally.

Children use everyday language to talk about and solve problems involving size and position. 

 

Language is pre-taught and modelled in different contexts. Opportunities for using this language is planned for through various sorting activities and finding objects in the environment. Adults model the language they need (small/little, medium/middle sized, large/big and positional language) and encourage children to use it, providing additional support if needed.

Children use everyday language to talk about and solve problems involving weight and capacity. 

Language is pre-taught and modelled in different contexts. Opportunities for children to use this language is planned for using activities such as using different sized filling and pouring containers in the water or using weighing scales in the role play shop for example. Adults model the language they need (heavy, light, heaviest, lightest, full, empty, more, less) and encourage children to use it, providing additional support if needed.

Children use everyday language to talk about and solve problems involving distance. 

 

Language is pre-taught and modelled in different contexts. Opportunities for children to use this language is planned for using activities and games where distance is discussed/measured, such as rolling hoops – who’s went the furthest? Using bricks, feet or measuring tapes to measure a distance between two objects etc. Adults model the language they need (near, far, furthest, nearest, long, short, longer, shorter, longest, shortest) and encourage children to use it, providing additional support if needed. 

Children use everyday 

language to talk about and solve problems involving time. 

 

Language is pre-taught and modelled in different contexts. Opportunities for

children to use this language is planned for using sequencing activities and the visual timetable. Adults model the language they need (first, next, after, before, later, soon, morning, afternoon, evening/night, yesterday, today, tomorrow) and encourage children to use it, providing additional support if needed.  

They explore characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language to describe them.

 

2-D and 3-D shapes are available for self –selection. Shapes hunts, shape songs, feely bag shape game and shape quizzes are planned for and adults support children with this. Related language is pre-taught, modelled and displayed.  

Impact

  • Children will be able to manipulate numbers across the curriculum and count accurately. They will understand number as a value by ordering, how amounts can change if you add or subtract and use language related to comparing quantities and groups such as ‘more’ or ‘fewer’. They will be able to practically problem solve in different situations such as sharing an amount so that it is fair, working out how many there are altogether or how many will be left if an amount is subtracted. 
  • Children will be able to identify shapes in the environment and become aware of purpose. Children will be able to spot patterns and make links/connections, challenging their mathematical thinking and in turn being able to create their own patterns using a range of media. 
  • Children will develop a breadth of mathematical language along with understanding of meaning. Language will be transferable and support problem solving and explanation of knowledge for teacher assessment.  

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